Nevercrew, "Transmitting Machine No.1"
Nevercrew, "Transmitting Machine No.1"
Nevercrew, "Transmitting Machine No.1"
Nevercrew, "Transmitting Machine No.1"
Nevercrew, "Transmitting Machine No.1"
Nevercrew, "Transmitting Machine No.1"
Nevercrew, "Transmitting Machine No.1"
Nevercrew, "Transmitting Machine No.1"

Nevercrew, "Transmitting Machine No.1"

$130.00
" Transmitting Machine No.1" by Nevercrew
18 x 24 Inches
Regular (Blue): 7-color screen print with gloss ink layer | Signed & numbered limited edition of 50
Variant (Red):  7-color screen print with gloss ink layer | Signed & numbered limited edition of 25

Please allow 4-6 week for delivery.

Beluga Whales

Beluga whales swimming in estuary of Cunningham River, Somerset Island, Northwest Territories, Canada.

Photograph by Gunter Ziesler

The highlight species of this edition is the beluga whale.

Belugas are extremely sociable mammals that live, hunt and migrate together in pods, ranging from a few individuals to hundreds of whales. Their bulbous forehead, called a "melon”, is flexible and capable of changing shape. This allows them to make different facial expressions. Belugas can produce a series of chirps, clicks, whistles and squeals, which give the beluga its other name, "the canary of the sea." They may sound like music or even nonsense to us, but to fellow belugas they convey important information.

Many populations of belugas migrate as the sea ice changes in the Arctic. They move south in the fall as the ice forms and then return to feed again in the spring, as the ice breaks up. They can also be found near river mouths, and sometimes even venture up river. Belugas feed on a variety of fish species, such as salmon and herring, as well as shrimp, crabs and mollusks. (Source: WWF)

Artist Statement

"The relationship between mankind and nature is obviously constant, and so are its effects in both directions. Sometimes these effects are clearly recognizable, sometimes are hidden, and sometimes are just not seen.The Beluga whale, because of its small size and its behavioral habits, has always been in direct conflict with humans, being subjected to hunting and being the first cetacean to be exploited alive in aquariums and zoos.

Moreover, the animal is very affected by water pollution and the effects of the warming climate. For all these reasons and following the idea of constant communication between mankind and nature, it could be seen as a living litmus paper. Another natural indicator from which to understand how the environmental balance is affected by human impact. "

- Nevercrew